Skip to main content

About your Search

20121129
20121207
STATION
KQED (PBS) 28
LANGUAGE
English 28
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)
and russian foreign ministers met with the u.n. envoy on syria and hillary clinton said events on the ground in syria are accelerating. she also joined the u.s. defense secretary in expressing concern that damascus is considering using chemical weapons against the rebels. >> i think there is no question that we remain very concerned, very concerned. as the opposition advances, in particular on damascus, the regime might very well consider the use of chemical weapons. >> secretary panetta went on to say that the white house made it clear there will be consequences should the assad regime make the mistake of using those weapons on its own people. for more on the perspective from damascus, i spoke a short time ago to the bbc's jeremy bolon -- jeremy bowen. >> the issue has been pretty firm on the use of chemical weapons. any news from damascus? >> i think the regime here can feel the pressure. it has been under huge pressure in the last couple of weeks, increasing pressure. of the most pressure has faced from the west, certainly, in the almost two years this has been going on. i spoke before pa
palestinian status at the u.n.; reading the fine print; tackling immigration reform and re-purposing digital data gathered during the campaign. but first, the other news of the day. here's hari sreenivasan. >> sreenivasan: wall street tracked the ups and downs of the fiscal cliff drama in washington today. at one point, the dow jones industrial average was off more than 100 points. but stocks made up the ground after the president's talk of a deal by christmas. the dow ended with a gain of nearly 107 points to close at 12,985. the nasdaq rose 24 points to close well over 2,991. a moderate republican senator susan collins of maine voiced new concerns today about u.n. ambassador susan rice. it stemmed from rice's initial account, on a sunday talk show, of the attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi, libya. at the time, she said it began as an anti-american protest, but she now says she was working off faulty intelligence. rice met with collins for 90 minutes today, but afterward the senator remained critical. >> i still have many questions that remain unanswered. i continue to be troubled by
best november since 1973. in syria, the u.n. announced it is pulling out non-essential international staff for their own safety. those who remain will be restricted to the capital city, damascus. separately, the u.s. voiced mounting concern about activity at syrian government sites storing chemical weapons. this afternoon, president obama warned syrian leader bashar al- assad not to cross that line. oday i want to make it absolutely clear to assad and those under his command, the world is watching. the use of chemical weapons is and would be totally unacceptable. and if you make the tragic mistake of using these weapons, there will be consequences. and you will be held accountable. >> sreenivasan: in response, syria's government released a statement saying it would never use chemical weapons on its own people. the regime has never confirmed it has such weapons. there were warnings about greater curbs on the internet, as the world's nations gathered today for a summit on telecommunications. the 11-day conference in dubai is the first such review since 1988, well before the web was ful
as a result of the u.n. vote. the palestinians say it will enhance the prospects of the two states living side by side. >> this enhanced status will not change much on the ground right now. but it will change the bid for a fully independent and sovereign state. they could theoretically pursue claims against israel's occupation in international criminal court. it has been a dramatic disaster for israel. ministers having to explain to their own people tonight why only a handful of nations, including the u.s., were backing down in the voting against the palestinian bid, which israel said was a move against peace. >> one thing is certain, we are not obligated anymore by any agreements with the palestinians. we can act according to our own interests. >> the people have renewed hope. the palestinian leaders have missed many opportunities before. can they push on from here and reach the elusive peace agreement that would put an israeli and palestinian state side by side? >> i am showing to now by a senior fellow from the middle east council on foreign relations and formerly of the state department. t
status at the when last week, a move opposed by israel -- at the u.n. last week, a move opposed by israel. >> in the middle east, you cannot allow that and ignore it. >> thanks to the u.n., the palestinians may have greater self-confidence. but more is ready sediments hurt their ambitions for full status. -- but more israeli settlements hurt their ambitions for full status, and they wan tthe -- they want the u.n. to move in. if these settlements continue to grow, britain and france have hinted at sterner action, although they are unlikely to go as far as withdrawing embassadors. -- embassadors -- ambassadors. >> rwanda has rejected a report that says it was involved in the rebel goma capture rebel in congo -- the democratic republic of congo. the drc is now back in control -- control. in the uk, starbucks says it will start paying corporation tax. the company has nearly 1/3 of the uk coffee shop market, but has only paid the tax once in the past 15 years. starbucks has been stung by public criticism of its actions. you're watching "bbc world news america." still to come on tonight's progr
extends to presidential appointments, as u.n. ambassador susan rice struggles to defuse opposition to her possible nomination to secretary of state. >> i relied solely and squarely on the information provided to me by the intelligence community. >> i would just ask the president to step back for a moment and realize that all of us here hold the secretary of state to a very different standard than most cabinet members. gwen: who will win the first rounds of the post-election battle? covering the week, gloria borger of cnn, susan davis of "usa today," and mike viqueira of nbc news. >> award-winning reporting and analysis, covering history as it happens, live from our nation's capitol, this is "washington week" with gwen ifill, produced in association with "national journal." corporate funding for "washington week" is provided by -- >> this rock has never stood still. since 1875 we've been there for our clients through good times and bad. when their needs changed we were there to meet them. through the years from insurance to investment management, from real estate to retirement solutions, w
with israel. but the israeli ambassador to the u.n., ron prosor, warned that the palestinians are turning their backs on peace. >> for as long as president abbas prefers symbolism over reality, as long as he prefers to travel to new york for u.n. resolutions rather than travel to jerusalem for genuine dialogue, any hope of peace will be out of reach. >> sreenivasan: meanwhile, a bipartisan group of u.s. senators said today they will push to cut off u.s. aid, if the palestinians use their new status to bring israel before the international criminal court. in iraq, a wave of attacks today killed at least 43 people. most of the victims were in the city of hillah, south of baghdad. back-to-back explosions targeted shi-ite pilgrims and emergency responders. the force of the blasts left twisted wreckage of cars outside shops in a busy commercial area. a third bombing killed six people near a shrine in the city of karbala. a year-long inquiry into british media practices ended today with a call for new regulation. lord justice brian leveson led the investigation. it was triggered by a scandal ov
been contaminated. >> reporter: experts believe cholera was brought here by u.n. peacekeepers. untreated sewage from this base flowed into a tributary of the river, the major source of water for both washing and drinking. cholera is spread by fecal-oral contact. two years on 200,000 patients have been sickened, 750 d 7,500 have died from diarrhea and fluid loss. each flood brings more contaminated water, more cases. the epidemic prompted massive relief efforts and public campaigns. on the streets and in classrooms promoting hygiene and sanitation. fatalities have dropped from 10% of cases early on to about 1%. still, 600 people have died from cholera this year. many in remote areas even those unaffected by floods. there's now plenty of awareness of cholera in haiti. the biggest challenge for people today is distance. as the epidemic subsided over the last few months many treatment centers have been closed in the remote areas. getting to plays that remain open is a huge challenge that can take hours. and that delay can be fatal. this man, a 27-year-old mother of three, will lik
is susan rice, the u.n. ambassador. she has some experience there. and then she goes on with obama to be the ambassador, if she is successful. we do not know if she is going to be, but if she is successful of navigating this, let to be secretary of state, what has been, and what do you think will be in the second term the u.s. relationship with the continent in the obama era? >> the progressive element on the african continent and certainly nigeria, from the very beginning this sort of extra expectation. obama it is an american. he is from a country called america. for americans. anything which we get from that administration is a bonus. it is time the african nation stop relying on changes in administration elsewhere. as part of the movement away from the original. and so we should not expect any special treatment from the u.s. administration. on the contrary, a sense of belonging should encourage the leaders to try to make things easier. there are enough problems in the world. it is a young continent, if you like, in terms of what is happening elsewhere. they should be able to or
bank. the associated press reported the development one day after the u.n. general assembly recognized palestine as a non-member observer state, including gaza, the west bank and east jerusalem. the palestinians quickly condemned any new settlement building. chief negotiator saeb erekat accused israel of "defying the whole international community." in syria, internet access and most phone service was blocked for a second day. opposition activists blamed the regime. government officials insisted rebels were behind the outage. meanwhile, fighting continued in and around damascus, but government troops managed to reopen the road to the city's airport. the u.s. soldier accused of espionage in the wikileaks document dump has conceded he considered suicide after his arrest. private first class bradley manning was cross-examined today in a pre-trial hearing at fort meade, maryland. he admitted making a noose out of bed sheets before being sent to the u.s. marine corps brig at quantico, virginia. manning says his treatment there was so harsh, the charges should be dismissed. the military says
point of negotiations, the appearance was that the u.n. secretary general, the u.s. secretary of state, the president of egypt and a few more foreign ministers all came in a way to save hamas and the islamic jihad. now, this is rather strange that two terrorist organizations which are involved almost endlessly in killing innocent people which are exercising the most authoritarian regime in gaza are protected by these countries. but that was the result of the way in which the whole thing was handled and i'm not sure that is helpful toward the future. >> rose: let me go back in the past. what exactly did you and mr. abbas negotiate and why did it not hold? >> well, that's a good question. first of all, it didn't hold because at the very end when we were a very, very, very close to conclude an agreement between israel and the palestinians which have -- would have resolve it had historical conflict between the two sides and would have created two states, palestinian state, you recognize boundaries and, of course, the state of israel is the home of the jewish people. in recognized bound rei
to account. >> brown: that was a view shared by u.n. secretary general ban ki-moon, speaking at a climate conference in qatar. >> the country has a fundamental responsibility to keep this stockpile of chemical weapons in the safest way. i have warned that if in any case these should be used then there will be huge consequences and they should be accountable. >> brown: and as fears of chemical warfare grow, the humanitarian crisis has steadily worsened. more refugees streamed into turkey today, fleeing syrian air raids. >> brown: for more on the syrian chemical weapons threat i'm joined by leonard spector, a weapons and nonproliferation expert with the monterey institute of international studies. that can be hard to say. welcome back. the white house says it has increased concern the government might be prepared to use these weapons. what does that mean? what are they seeing? >> we don't know precisely what they're seeing. there are rumors that there is some sort of preparation for the chemicals that would be used in these weapons. there are preliminary steps that sometimes are taken. they
minister sergei lavrov and u.n. envoy lakdar brahimi who spoke to the press. >> we haven't taken any sensational decisions but i think we have agreed that the situation is bad and we have agreed that we must continue to work together to see how we can find creative ways of bringing this problem under control and hopefully starting to solve it. >> brown: all of this, amid rising fears that the syrian president might use chemical weapons against the rebels. in washington, defense secretary leon panetta joined a chorus of u.s. warnings. >> the intelligence that we have raises serious concerns that this is being considered. >> reporter: those concerns were echoed on capitol hill. >> if syrian tv is catching this news conference, there's been a tidal shift here to where military force will be used to prevent those chemical weapons from ever seeing the light of day. >> brown: but syria's deputy foreign minister, speaking on lebanese t.v., charged that if anyone is planning to use chemical warfare, it's the west. >> ( translated ): we have strong fear of the existence of a conspiracy to use
might happen. still, n.y.u. professor april klein says companies are over doing it. >> i know they say you can never be too rich or too thin, but companies can in fact be too rich. and, sometimes you do want to shrink out the cash. >> reporter: that's because too much cash can make a company a takeover target. and, with interest rates so low, all that money is just not productive. special dividends are one option for corporate treasurers struggling to spend it. but, what happened to firms investing capital for the future, by hiring new workers, buying other businesses, or on research and development? experts say we won't see that until lawmakers get their act together. >> right now corporate managers are essentially holding their cash waiting for greater policy clarity. and, until greater policy clarity comes, i don't expect to see an real significant deployment of cash whether it be in investment or returning cash to shareholders. >> reporter: and, then, there are share buybacks, which like dividends are popular this year. buybacks are considered a sign management views its stock unde
ultimately took responsibility for guilford's safety. >> nut. >> n-u-t. >> i believe that everybody that is involved should be held accountable. at&t, the contractors, general dynamics and the smaller companies that are subcontracted out. everybody in this process should be held accountable for and have to pay fines and have regulations that they all have to live up to. >> smith: after guilford died, the foreman for all around towers disappeared and was never questioned by osha. the company quickly went out of business, but two of its owners, who declined interview requests, then started another company that continues to do work in the industry. that doesn't surprise those who study subcontracting. >> the problem of focusing the enforcement attention at the bottom, at the small subcontractor, is a little bit like the old game of whac-a-mole. you can enforce your osha standards on that individual contractor and hit t mole, but there are a lot of other contractors that are going to pop up. if we want to improve conditions in a workplace like towers, we have to think about the system t
. >> rose: lakhdar brahimi is here n august he replaced kofi annan as u.s. enjoy to syria, one of the most experienced diplomats in the world. he's deeply familiar with arab affairs. during the 198 0s he was undersecretary general of arab league. in the 1990s he served as algeria's foreign minister. after that he was special envoy to afghanistan and then to iraq post saddal hussein. when he became envoy to syria earlier this year he described his mission as quote nearly impossible. he is in new york this week to report to the united nations and security council on that mission and on the situation in syria. i'm pleased to have him back at this table, welcome. >> thank you very much. >> rose: you must be exhausted. >> i'm all right. >> rose: what will you say to the united nations. >> you know what, i'm going to tell them what i have been saying all along about the situation in syria is extremely bad. and dangerous. and getting worse. until now nobody has found a way of bringing it under control. we know that this is part of the arab spring. we know that change is coming. but as i think you
are having trying to find new projects in regions outside the u.s. and with interest rates currently at historic lows, the timing was right to ink the two deals. diane eastabrook, "n.b.r.," chicago. >> tom: daniel rohr is a metals and mining analyst from morningstar and joins us from chicago. dan, how unique of a deal is this in the u.s. to have mining and energy drilling all in the same company? >> it is very unusual, forthe p. decades, ago, however, we had seen a lot of the oil majors, folks like amco, with exposure to mining as well. this is an animal we haven't seen in quite sometime in the u.s. >> tom: what drove the deal for freport, why did it want to go outside its expertise mining, that was two generations of leaders ago. why now? >> yeah. i'm still struggling with the underlying strategic rationale for this deal. judging by the stock market, i can't see a clear rationale as far as why they did this. what management has said is they see a compelling story for oil and gas demand over the next several decades, and the purchase of plains and m.n.r., was a good way to bet on tha
technology improves and gets less expensive. diane eastabrook, "n.b.r.," chicago. >> tom: tomorrow, we'll have more on the auto industry with the outlook on the u.s. from the world's most profitable automaker, volkswagen. >> susie: more pressure on s.a.c. capital today on word that the u.s. government might bring civil fraud charges against the firm, one of the biggest hedge funds in the world. during a conference call with investors, the company said it has received a so-called wells notice from the securities and exchange commission, often the first step to formal charges. the move comes a week after a former portfolio manager was charged with running the most lucrative insider trading schemes. s.a.c.'s billionaire founder, steve cohen, told clients he is confident that he "acted appropriately." well, another big company today authorizing a special dividend in anticipation of higher taxes next year. now it's costco jumping on the dividend bandwagon as a way to beat some of the impact of the fiscal cliff fallout. the wholesale club operator announced a special dividend of $7 a share t
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)